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Forest ecology depends on good fires, which are nature’s way of spring cleaning–clearing out brush, restoring natural habitats and preventing wildfires. Learn more about how carefully planned and professionally managed prescribed fires give nature some help at GoodFires.org.

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There are 157 places within 200 miles of zip code 37201 (Nashville, TN) that match your search request.

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Displaying all parks, forests and wildlife areas.

Pickett State Park Hiking Fishing Camping Biking Horseback Boating

Jamestown, TN 38556 (103.995 miles)

Situated in a remote section of the upper Cumberland Plateau, Pickett CCC Memorial State Park is known for its geological, botanical, and scenic wonders. Visitors to the park can explore large rock houses, natural sandstone bridges, scenic bluffs, and wild mountain streams. More than 58 miles of hiking trails meander through the wilderness and the surrounding forest. They vary in length and difficulty, from short day-use trails suitable for families, to longer multi-day backpacking trails. A backcountry camping permit is required through the park office. The trails afford views of sandstone bluffs, natural bridges, waterfalls and diverse plant life. Situated in a remote section of the upper Cumberland Plateau, Pickett CCC Memorial State Park is known for its geological, botanical, and scenic wonders. Visitors to the park can explore large rock houses, natural sandstone bridges, scenic bluffs, and wild mountain streams. More than 58 miles of hiking trails meander through the wilderness and the surrounding forest. They vary in length and difficulty, from short day-use trails suitable for families, to longer multi-day backpacking trails. A backcountry camping permit is required through the park office. The trails afford views of sandstone bluffs, natural bridges, waterfalls and diverse plant life.

Official Website: Pickett State Park

Marrowbone State Forest Hiking Fishing Hunting

Jamestown, KY 42629 (109.069 miles)

Marrowbone State Forest and Wildlife Management Area is a 1,608-acre tract of land located on Highway 90 in Metcalfe and Cumberland counties. Marrowbone State Forest is open to the public for day use only unless hunting regulations specify extended hours. Allowable activities include regulated hunting, hiking and wildlife viewing. ATVs and horseback riding are prohibited.

Official Website: Marrowbone State Forest

Ben Hawes State Park Hiking Biking

Owensboro, KY 42301 (111.522 miles)

Located in Western Kentucky, Ben Hawes State Park offers opportunities for fun and education. On the park grounds are the remains of a deep coal mine operation that thrived from the early 1900s through the 1950s. Several buildings remain that can be reached by hiking trails. Park benches are conveniently located around the mine site. Along the wooded countryside of the park, there is an outdoor classroom where nature classes can be held.

Official Website: Ben Hawes State Park

Prentice Cooper State Forest Hiking Fishing Hunting Camping Biking Horseback Boating

Chattanooga, TN 37343 (111.983 miles)

Prentice Cooper State Forest is located in southeastern Tennessee, in Marion County. The forest is approximately 10 miles west of Chattanooga and is heavily utilized by the public. It is situated on the scenic Tennessee River Gorge. The property for Prentice Cooper was acquired by simple purchase between 1938 and 1944. The site was proclaimed a State Forest in 1945. Sixty-nine percent of the forest are in multiple-use regulated forests and the remainder is in conservation areas.

Official Website: Prentice Cooper State Forest

Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge Fishing Hunting

Decatur, AL 35603 (112.441 miles)

Wheeler NWR, located along the Tennessee River between Huntsville and Decatur, was established in 1938 to provide habitat for wintering and migrating birds. Considered the easternmost Refuge in the Mississippi flyway, this 35,000 acre Refuge attracts thousands of wintering waterfowl each year and supports the southernmost and Alabama's only significant concentration of wintering Southern James Bay Canada geese. It also serves as winter habitat for the State's largest duck population. In addition to migratory birds, the Refuge hosts 115 species of fish, 74 species of reptiles and amphibians, 47 species of mammals, and 285 different species of songbirds. The Refuge is also home to 10 federally listed endangered or threatened species.

Official Website: Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

Key Cave Natioonal Wildlife Refuge Hunting

Decatur, AL 35603 (112.441 miles)

Key Cave NWR, located about 5 miles southwest of Florence, Alabama, was established in 1997 to ensure the biological integrity of Key Cave. Key Cave has been designated as critical habitat for the endangered Alabama cavefish (Speoplatyrhinus poulsoni) and as a priority one maternity cave for the endangered gray bat (Myotis grisescens). The cave is on the northern shore of Pickwick Lake in a limestone karst area that contains numerous sinkholes and several underground cave systems. The area’s sinkholes are an integral component of groundwater recharge to the cave. The area directly north of Key Cave was identified as a potential high hazard risk area for groundwater recharge and this is where the 1,060-acre Refuge was established.

Official Website: Key Cave Natioonal Wildlife Refuge

Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge Fishing Hunting

Decatur, AL 35603 (112.441 miles)

Fern Cave NWR consists of 199 acres of forested hillside underlain by a massive cave with many stalactite and stalagmite-filled rooms. The cave has five hidden entrances with four occurring on the Refuge. Access is extremely difficult and has been described as a vertical and horizontal maze by expert cavers. Horizontal sections of the cave are known to be more than 15 miles long and vertical drops of 450 feet are found within. Spectacular features including unrivaled formations, important paleological and archaeological finds, and a diverse cave fauna have contributed to Fern Cave as being described as the most spectacular cave in the U.S. and has fame both nationally and internationally.

Official Website: Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge

Sauta Cave National Wildlife Refuge Hiking

Decatur, AL 35603 (112.441 miles)

Sauta Cave NWR is located just above the Sauty Creek embayment on TVA's Guntersville Reservoir, 7 miles west of Scottsboro in Jackson County, Alabama. There is an entrance gate to the Refuge on the south side of U.S. Highway 72. Sauta Cave itself is gated and not open to the public due to the potential for disturbance of federally endangered gray bats. Other portions of the 264-acre refuge are open to the public. Persons wishing to visit the cave may park outside the Refuge entrance gate and walk in to the cave entrance. Sauta Cave NWR serves as a major maternity cave for gray bats where recent counts have documented up to 400,000 emerging from the cave. This natural phenomenon only occurs June -August and lasts for approximately one hour near dusk. To view bats emerging from the cave, park at the Refuge entrance gate and walk approximately 100 yards to the cave entrance on your right. A new wildlife viewing platform is available to watch the emergence. Remember to bring your umbrella.

Official Website: Sauta Cave National Wildlife Refuge

Big Cypress Tree State Park Hiking Fishing Camping Biking Horseback Boating

Greenfield, TN 38230 (112.673 miles)

This 330-acre natural area lies in the floodplain of the Middle Fork of the Obion River in West Tennessee. Visitors to Big Cypress Tree State Park will find a clean and peaceful park where they can relax and enjoy nature. A variety of plant life ranging from native wild flowers to native trees may be seen here. Wildlife seen at Big Cypress includes bluebirds, doves, hawks, owls, deer, squirrels, butterflies, bats, and many others. During the Fall Festival, held each fall during the month of September, visitors may see up close several birds of prey including a bald eagle.

Official Website: Big Cypress Tree State Park

Shiloh National Military Park Hiking

Shiloh, TN 38376 (113.225 miles)

Shiloh National Military Park was established in 1894 to preserve the scene of the first major battle in the Western theater of the Civil War. The two-day battle, April 6 and 7, 1862, involved about 65,000 Union and 44,000 Confederate troops, resulting in nearly 24,000 killed, wounded, and missing. It proved to be a decisive victory for the federal forces when they advanced on and seized control of the Confederate railway system at Corinth, Mississippi. The park offers hiking trails. For more information call (731) 689-5696.

Official Website: Shiloh National Military Park